Can The iPad Or The Kindle Save Book Publishers? (NPR)

Ken Aulette was just interviewed on the NPR show Fresh Air. The MP3 has just been posted online, so I haven't had a chance to listen to it. But there are some highlights available.


On how publishers hope e-books will work

"It opens up a new market, potentially to younger people. Secondly, what publishers hope to do -- and they've belatedly jumped into this and I think they were much too late -- but nevertheless, they're trying to create multimedia functionality out of a book. So they're offering a new kind of book in an e-book. It's not just an electronic book. It's a book that allows you to go to an archive -- to access things in a multimedia dimension. And their hope is that they can actually charge more for that."

On how the iPad fits into the existing market for electronic -- and traditional -- publishing

"By the iPad coming into the market, it gives the publishers leverage over Amazon. They were afraid that Amazon -- with an 80 percent market share of e-books -- would basically continue to lower prices and basically have them over a barrel. And now they feel like they've regained some leverage and regained leverage over their ability to price books. Apple has allowed them to set the price of a book and they've compelled Amazon to go along with that, much to Amazon's reluctance."

About Nate Hoffelder (11469 Articles)
Nate Hoffelder is the founder and editor of The Digital Reader: "I've been into reading ebooks since forever, but I only got my first ereader in July 2007. Everything quickly spiraled out of control from there. Before I started this blog in January 2010 I covered ebooks, ebook readers, and digital publishing for about 2 years as a part of MobileRead Forums. It's a great community, and being a member is a joy. But I thought I could make something out of how I covered the news for MobileRead, so I started this blog."

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