Can you believe the IDPF choose the Enron Swastika logo over these?

Back in April/May the IDPF had a contest to pick a new logo for Epub.  they announced the new logo at their conference during the last week in May. FYI:  I've given this logo the name "Enron Swastika" because that's what it looks like.

Just today I learned that some of the alternate logos were posted on a set of slides at the conference.  I want to know which one you prefer. (Initially I was going to upload the pictures, but I think they look better on the PDF.)

I picked the official logo as the lead for this post. Here's my favorite:


About Nate Hoffelder (11477 Articles)
Nate Hoffelder is the founder and editor of The Digital Reader: "I've been into reading ebooks since forever, but I only got my first ereader in July 2007. Everything quickly spiraled out of control from there. Before I started this blog in January 2010 I covered ebooks, ebook readers, and digital publishing for about 2 years as a part of MobileRead Forums. It's a great community, and being a member is a joy. But I thought I could make something out of how I covered the news for MobileRead, so I started this blog."

9 Comments on Can you believe the IDPF choose the Enron Swastika logo over these?

  1. Awful. There are at least 3 far better choices than the one chosen.

  2. I don’t quite understand why people get so upset when someone picks a logo. First the GAP now Epub.

    I have to admit none of the ones on the presentation really grabbed me. But, the logo is supposed to represent the company’s view of themselves and how they want to be seen. Not the user/customer view of the company.

    • It’s not a company logo. If it were, then I would have no grounds to complain.

      This logo represents the ebook format, and we are all expected to use it. It’s quite reasonable for me to say that I hate the logo.

    • I definitely hear what you’re saying, but as a marketing copywriter, I can attest to the fact that branding and logo development has evolved into more than simply what the company thinks of itself. Your brand identity develops from the way your customers think of you and interact with your brand. Companies absolutely should consider what their customers think and solicit their input/feedback — that’s what hurt the Gap…the fact that they didn’t ask for input until it was too late. (This isn’t original thinking on my part — Seth Godin has a good definition of branding here:

      Nate, I like the version you picked (I couldn’t access the PDF). I agree that the one they chose was a little too Enron-esque.

  3. It’s not hard to see why they picked that one, though. Look at all the others – the roman letters “epub” are a critical part of every logo except for the one they picked. Take a look at the pdf – strip the letters out of each – and you strip away most of the image from all of them. The logo in the one they picked resembles an E to the western eye, but also serves as a viable non-letter logo to people writing in other alphabets.

    It’s absolutely critical that they get China on board. It’s the world’s second largest economy, fastest growing large economy, and represents a huge percent of the world’s population – and much of their writing uses non-roman characters. I think they felt having a branding symbol that doesn’t use the letters epub was important.

  4. I laughed when I first saw it via a Google Image search–I thought maybe it was a weird parody of Enron. I actually thought, “Wow, someone must really hate the IDPF.” Then I realized it was legit.

    In fairness to the IDPF, I doubt the logo carries the same symbolic baggage for those who didn’t live in the U.S. during the Enron scandal.

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