UK publishers are even more pig-headed than American pubs

From The Book Seller:

The Publishers Association has set out an agreed position on e-book lending in libraries that will see library users blocked from downloading e-books outside of the library premises. Faber c.e.o. Stephen Page announced the new guidelines this morning (21 October) at the CILIP Public Library Authorities conference in Leeds. Page told conference delegates that "all the major trade publishers have agreed to work with aggregators to make it possible for libraries to offer e-book lending" with the addition of certain "controls". He said the guidelines had been developed because of concerns over free e-book lending offered by some libraries to lenders "wherever you are" in breach of publisher contracts.
Right now I bet the RIAA is kicking themselves for not thinking of this first. They're going to add a new clause to their contract with Apple: everyone who buys from iTunes must do so from an Apple store.

But seriously, what century are they living in? Physical location is irrelevant when it comes to getting digital content. Everyone but these UK pubs have figured that out already. People won't go to the library just to get ebooks; they'll go to Google and pirate the ebook instead.

About Nate Hoffelder (11473 Articles)
Nate Hoffelder is the founder and editor of The Digital Reader: "I've been into reading ebooks since forever, but I only got my first ereader in July 2007. Everything quickly spiraled out of control from there. Before I started this blog in January 2010 I covered ebooks, ebook readers, and digital publishing for about 2 years as a part of MobileRead Forums. It's a great community, and being a member is a joy. But I thought I could make something out of how I covered the news for MobileRead, so I started this blog."

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