Readability now reconsidering their iOS app

Early this morning Apple announced changes in the rules for iTunes app developers and it looks like the new rules may already be bearing fruit.

Readability, a service that lets you save web content to read it later, are already thinking about submitting their iOS app again. They'd submitted the app back in February, but it was unfortunately rejected because of the in-app purchase rule.

You see, Readability aren't set up in a way that they could have afforded to pay Apple's 30% vig. Of all Readability's income, 70% goes to content providers. If they had to hand over the other 30% to Apple there would be nothing left to run the business.

If I were them, I would have started working on a HTML5 app back in February. But if they already have an app finished, it won't take much work to get it to comply with the new rules.

About Nate Hoffelder (11468 Articles)
Nate Hoffelder is the founder and editor of The Digital Reader: "I've been into reading ebooks since forever, but I only got my first ereader in July 2007. Everything quickly spiraled out of control from there. Before I started this blog in January 2010 I covered ebooks, ebook readers, and digital publishing for about 2 years as a part of MobileRead Forums. It's a great community, and being a member is a joy. But I thought I could make something out of how I covered the news for MobileRead, so I started this blog."

2 Comments on Readability now reconsidering their iOS app

  1. Html5 solutions aren’t the magic bullet that everyone acts like they are or will be.

    Take Nomad Editions for instance, it wasn’t until their launch in the iPad that they actually had their greatest success.

    As Doug of stated…

    “…I think publishers who are dreaming of HTML5 publishing should sit back a bit and ask themselves a couple of questions: first, how are their online products doing now compared to print? and how will they monetize an HTML5 magazine any differently than they would a natively designed app magazine?

    The advocates of web-based publishing often forget that most print publishers are not exactly raking it in online right now. That is why a tablet magazine, with its closed environment, is actually more like print because print publishers are generally better at selling products than they are access.”

  2. What Readability can do is go for ‘branding’ without paying advertising fees. People find out what they can do and they can put their shortest typeable URL there without making it a link.

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