Dropbox to Add Support for Multiple Account Access Next Month

If you dropbox-logo[1]happen to use Dropbox's cloud storage service for both work and your own personal needs then I have some good news for you. The Verge is reporting that Dropbox will be holding a press event on 9 April where they plan to unveil new support for accessing multiple Dropbox accounts. Dropbox users with a Business account will soon be able to also access their personal account without having to log out and back in. According to an email sent out to Business customers, Dropbox also plans to roll out new tools for administrators at the event.

The features will go live on 9 April, and will probably require updates for the Dropbox apps for Windows and other platforms.

Dropbox has long been paying more attention to their business customers than to consumers, but that makes sense given that the latter group is less willing to pay for what many companies, including Google, Dropbox, Microsoft, and Apple are giving away as freebies.

I can't speak for Dropbox's business services, but at this point there's no way I would get  space on their servers. Google is a much better value, now that it has reduced their price schedule. And with Google giving away the first 15GB free, there's little reason for me to even bother signing in to my Dropbox account and access the free 2GB they offer.

About Nate Hoffelder (11479 Articles)
Nate Hoffelder is the founder and editor of The Digital Reader: "I've been into reading ebooks since forever, but I only got my first ereader in July 2007. Everything quickly spiraled out of control from there. Before I started this blog in January 2010 I covered ebooks, ebook readers, and digital publishing for about 2 years as a part of MobileRead Forums. It's a great community, and being a member is a joy. But I thought I could make something out of how I covered the news for MobileRead, so I started this blog."

3 Comments on Dropbox to Add Support for Multiple Account Access Next Month

  1. Microsoft is offering 100 G of its One Drive, free for a year if you use bing and have earned a 100 credits in it (which is simply from using it as a search engine).

    Dropbox has a number of features that is better than Google’s equivalent if you need them (speaking as a long term dropbox user), particularly on sharing between people, machines, and with really good version control.

    I also recommend PictureLife for backing up pictures.

  2. It’s not necessarily about who provides more space cheaper. I have DropBox because a lot of apps use it to sync across multiple platforms, say keeping an iPad and Mac version of an app in sync, etc.

    For just plain file sharing… I’ll use it too, since everybody has one, and fewer people have Google Drive or OneDrive, although that’s changing.

  3. With the amount of free storage offered by google Drive, Dropbox is going to see a massive exodus. Many of the people who payed for 10 GB are going to jump ship to the free 15GB google Drive accounts. Google drive does almost everything dropbox does just as well (A few weird exceptions: can’t selectively sync subfolders, manual trash emptying).

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