Infographic: Famous Fictional Schools

famous-schools-from-fiction-100Here's something fun. Did you ever wonder just often a school is used as a setting in a story?

It happens more than you think - just not in books. An infographic crossed me desk this morning which lists famous schools from fiction, including Hogwarts, Crunchem Hall, and Forks High.

The graphic is regrettably biased towards schools shown in movies and tv shows, but that is not a sign of a poorly made graphic.  No, I think it reflects that schools aren't used in books as a setting nearly as often as you might think. I found a wikia focused on fictional schools, and from what I can see movies and tv shows are much more likely to be set in a school (it's an ideal setting for a horror movie like The Breakfast Club, for example).

Books, on the other hand, tend to focus more on what a kid might do outside of school than in. That's an interesting contrast, isn't it?

Is there a fictional school that you think should have been included?

famous-schools-from-fiction-100

About Nate Hoffelder (11579 Articles)
Nate Hoffelder is the founder and editor of The Digital Reader:"I've been into reading ebooks since forever, but I only got my first ereader in July 2007. Everything quickly spiraled out of control from there. Before I started this blog in January 2010 I covered ebooks, ebook readers, and digital publishing for about 2 years as a part of MobileRead Forums. It's a great community, and being a member is a joy. But I thought I could make something out of how I covered the news for MobileRead, so I started this blog."

7 Comments on Infographic: Famous Fictional Schools

  1. What about Lev Grossman’s series “The Magicians”? The first book mostly takes place in Brakebills Academy, somewhere in New York. The other books also refer back to that training ground.

  2. Tom Brown Schooldays by Thomas Hughes (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tom_Brown%27s_School_Days).
    It’s an English book. The story is set in the 1830s at Rugby School, a public school for boys. “Public” meaning private. That was the kind of school that created administrators for the English Empire. I read it about 60 years ago (I went to [what is called] an English School in Argentina, where part of the curricula is in Spanish (as taught in Argentine public schools) and part is in English (as taught in England) and prepares students to take the English General Certificate of Education exams

    • But surely this misses out on the “fictional” criterion? Rugby is a real school and has existed for over 400 years.

  3. The Yorkshire School in Nicholas Nickelby.

    And let’s not forget that awesome space academy in Ender’s Game.

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