Infographic: How to Read Like a Detective

Sometimes we use tricks to avoid reading a book, but when we're not shirking the activity of reading it pays to read closely and get as much detail as possible.

The following infographic can help hone your analytical skills. It features advice on how to “look for clues,” “ask questions,” and “making your case.” I’ve embedded the full image below for you to explore further; what do you think?

read like a detective

GalleyCat

image by pasukaru76

About Nate Hoffelder (11579 Articles)
Nate Hoffelder is the founder and editor of The Digital Reader:"I've been into reading ebooks since forever, but I only got my first ereader in July 2007. Everything quickly spiraled out of control from there. Before I started this blog in January 2010 I covered ebooks, ebook readers, and digital publishing for about 2 years as a part of MobileRead Forums. It's a great community, and being a member is a joy. But I thought I could make something out of how I covered the news for MobileRead, so I started this blog."

1 Comment on Infographic: How to Read Like a Detective

  1. An Autistic Approach To Reading Assignments

    “What words stick out at me?” should be “What? Words stick out at me!”

    “Who is speaking in the text and why?”

    The character, because the author wrote that they are speaking.

    “What seems most important?” Carrying on reading until I’ve finished. Housework much less so.

    “What questions do I have?” How about “Why won’t you leave me alone to finish this book? Are you being deliberately cruel?”

    “What do I think the author is trying to say?” Well, I’ll know if you’ll let me finish the damned book without interrupting with all these pointless questions!

    “Is there anything missing from the text?” I hope not, or I’ll have to have strong words with the publisher.

    “I think _______ because _______.” I think I’ll take a toilet break now, because I’ve just finished my coffee.

    “The text says _______, so _______.” The text says interesting things, so I’ll carry on reading.

    “The main idea of the text is _______.” The main idea of the text is to get the reader to carry on to the end of the book.

    “Here are 3 reasons why.” 1. So that the reader will enjoy the whole story. 2. So they’ll recommend it to other people. 3. So that the author sells more copies and can keep earning a living from writing.

    “What can you guess about the story from its clues?” Nothing. What clues? I’m just along for the ride!

    “What details do you notice when you re-read the text?” All of them. Why, did you think I’d just skim on subsequent readings?

    “What seems the most important to share?” The book.

    And coffee. Both are better when shared.

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  1. New Infographic: How to Read Like a Detective – Stephen's Lighthouse

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