What Are You Reading On?

5169694908_38129d0085_bThis week's news about the new Kindles has sparked discussions both here, on MobileRead Forums, and elsewhere about readers' current ebook gadget.

Many of us are looking at our current hardware and asking whether we want to upgrade (or can even afford to do so). Readers have been talking what they like most about their current device, and what tempt them into replacing it.

The discussion has made for fascinating reading, so I have decided to post an open question and ask readers what gadgets they are reading on.

I'll go first.

Right now I am reading ebooks, Instapaper, emails, and other content on a 10? RCA-branded Viking Pro tablet. It's thin and light, and I love the huge screen, and best of all this tablet is under-powered when compared to devices like my missing iPad. Given the $80 price tag one wouldn't expect similar performance, but the limited performance is also secretly a benefit because it keeps me from installing apps. That equals fewer distractions taking me away from my reading.

While I do have a Kindle, as well as other ereaders, I much prefer the tablet. The Kindle's screen isn't big enough, and it lacks page turn buttons.

But the next one might have page turn buttons, and that's why I am so curious about the new Kindle and might buy one for myself.

So what are you reading on?

image by katerha

About Nate Hoffelder (11466 Articles)
Nate Hoffelder is the founder and editor of The Digital Reader: "I've been into reading ebooks since forever, but I only got my first ereader in July 2007. Everything quickly spiraled out of control from there. Before I started this blog in January 2010 I covered ebooks, ebook readers, and digital publishing for about 2 years as a part of MobileRead Forums. It's a great community, and being a member is a joy. But I thought I could make something out of how I covered the news for MobileRead, so I started this blog."

33 Comments on What Are You Reading On?

  1. I’ve given up reading ebooks on anything except my phone (which has a 5.5″ screen). It’s lighter than my tablet, more portable than my laptop, and more likely to be at hand when I have time to read. I store ebooks on the microSD card to keep the internal storage problem at bay. No problems yet. 🙂

  2. ebooks on a Kobo Aura HD, magazines and comics on an Asus z580ca

  3. all books on kindle voyage
    pdf & cbr on ipad mini

  4. Read primarily on my Sony ereader PRS-T1. I find reading on tablets, for long periods of time, difficult.

  5. Whilst I am waiting for my new Kindle Flame I read purchased EBooks on H2O. KU EBooks on Voyage. If out without my Reader will use Ascend Mate 7 Android Phone with either the Kindle App or Moon Reader.

  6. Got an old sony reader. PRS-600 I think. Still working fine.

  7. Voyage… only way to do it!

  8. I read all ebooks from BN, Kobo, Google, Apple, Kindle on the iPad mini and my phone. When the mini needs charging I switch to my Nook Glowlight Plus or my Kindle DX depending on what I am reading at that time and just wait for the charging to get done if I am in an Apple, Google or Kobo book. Whoever comes out with an 8 inch e-ink reader will get my exclusive business so I can stop shifting and keeping devices.

  9. I read on a variety of devices. I’ve owned several ereaders over the last several years, but my current set of ereading devices includes a 7″ Kindle Fire HDX (the 2013 model, apparently perma-stuck on FireOS, an 8″ Samsung Nook, and a Kobo Mini. I also own an iPhone (a 6) and an iPad Air.

    I do the majority of my ebook reading on the Nook, which I bought pretty much entirely because it was the cheapest way I could get a not-half-bad Android tablet, and I wanted something capable of running Lollipop. I also wanted something capable of installing multiple ebook reading apps, since I buy from a variety of places–Kobo primarily, but also Smashwords and occasionally directly from publishers who make a point of selling DRM-free stuff. I very occasionally buy directly from Amazon, but ONLY if it’s an indie author I want to support and I know they’re selling DRM-free.

    I WAS buying a bunch from B&N, who were the primary source for my ebooks before they started their current long-running decline (the other reason I wanted the 8″ Samsung Nook, since that gave me easy immediate access to my B&N library). So for my Nook, Kobo, and Amazon purchases, I tend to read those directly in the pertinent apps. (And it makes me kind of snicker to be reading in the Kobo app on a Nook.) For any of my indie purchases, I’m still waffling as to what I think is the best app to read those in. I use Calibre Companion to get the books onto the device to begin with, but so far, the various apps I’ve tried haven’t clicked with me. So I usually use the Nook’s native reader to read the indie titles.

    I’ll read on the phone if I don’t have the Nook with me, or if I’m working on reading something and forgot to sync my progress on the Nook, and am somewhere without immediate wifi access.

    I read digital comics on my iPad.

    I think that’s everything! 🙂

  10. Short articles on my phone but anything longer is exclusively on my Kindle Paperwhite 2.

    I’ve not read a paper book in close to 20 years.

  11. Kindle Keyboard. My preference is read the nice words instead of just looking at the pretty pictures.

  12. kindle hdx 7″, fire hd 6″, 4.7″ fire phone, 4.5″ moto g and kindle keyboard. when not at home read on the fire phone for the most part. kindle keyboard preferred for bright sunlight.

  13. 95% of the time if I’m reading an ebook I read on my iPad Air 2. If for some reason I don’t have my iPad with me, I read on my phone, which is an iPhone 6S Plus. I do have a Kindle Paperwhite, but I’ve gotten so used to the larger screen of the iPad that using the Kindle makes it feel like I spend all my time turning the pages. Also I wear bifocal contacts, which make it difficult to read in low light or with low contrast, so the iPad screen helps a lot.

  14. It’s probably worth asking what reading software you are using and how you get the document to the device. I read on the luxurious 12 Samsung Galaxy Tab. For non-DRM ebooks I upload everything onto Google Play Books. For downloads from the tablet itself, I choose to open in Adobe Digital Editions for android (GPB doesn’t have a reliable way to upload from tablets). For articles, I scoop them up with Evernote and read them offline on my tablet. I have become a huge fan of Medium recently. Oh, yes, Blue Fire for PDFs (no DRM and DRM).

    I also read on my ipad 1 occasionally too.

    One thing i miss is a good e-ink reader. I have one from 2010 that I use occasionally, but I’m due to buy a new one.

  15. Jonny Jamtjord // 6 April, 2016 at 1:29 pm // Reply

    ebooks in .mobi goes on the new Paperwhite and Voyage, and .epub (using Marvin) and .pdf (Kindle) goes on the two ipads (mini/reg) . So there will be no upgrader for the moment. Yes, and I use Calibre to keep order/track on most of my e-litterature !

  16. Kindle Paperwhite 2 and I-Phone occasionally for books. Pretty much use the Kindle multiple times per day. Have a cheap Fire but haven’t used it to read yet since I already had the Paperwhite. Only use the Fire for InoReader for RSS Feeds, Twitter, and streaming.

  17. I read books on my much loved Kobo H2O. It’s by far the best reader for me with its large screen, and being waterproof it’s beach and bathtub friendly. I read magazines (and any other PDF files) on my iPad using the GoodReader app.

  18. 85% of my reading is on Kindle fire hdx7 for audible (nicer to use with it built in.) and TTS for kindle books. I also use Amazon Echo to play my aidible books and read my Kindle books. For epub, I use Moon+Reader on my 8″ galaxy Note, With Ivona (Same voice on Kindle Fire.) TTS. Since I started listening to books instead of reading them om the page, my number of books read has gone up about 8 to 1.

  19. When I’m at home, I read kindle books, library books, and books from Project Gutenberg on my Paperwhite 3, which I bought last month.

    Away from home, my iPod Touch 6 handles all the books plus audiobooks from Audible and Librivox. The iPod is also what I use to read the daily installment on the Serial Reader app, plus the newspapers I read daily. The iPod is really an all-purpose reader for me.

  20. I read 90% (mostly fiction and narrative nonfiction) on a Google Nexus 5 phone, usually in the Bluefire app. Another 5% (mostly highly structured nonfiction) on an iPad Air, also mostly in Bluefire. The remaining 5% in miscellaneous apps on both devices. I try out different apps all the time, but I come back to Bluefire because it syncs across platforms.

  21. iPad mini 2 for all reading. Nothing else has the right shape, size and flexibility for my needs.

  22. Arnold Halperin // 6 April, 2016 at 2:51 pm // Reply

    I do most of my reading on my Kobo Aura. I really like having an e-reader that takes a micro-SD card — I like being able to carry all my ebooks around. While the Aura has a Pocket app, I do most of my magazine reading (via Pocket) on my iPhone 5s. I do like the sound of the RCA 10 Viking Pro you mentioned, and I’m thinking of ordering one from Walmart. For $80, what could go wrong?

  23. For PDFs and non fiction with maps and coloured illustrations I read on a Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 10.1 Tablet or sometimes on a Fire HDX 7”, though for illustrated works the latter’s screen is a bit small. I don’t really like either of these for novels.

    For fiction I almost always use a generation 7 Paperwhite. I find this is easier on the eyes, easier to hold and much less likely to run out of charge than the tablets. In summer I do a lot of my reading outside where the tablets are often unreadable. For sentimental reasons I keep my old keyboard Kindle – and even sometimes read on it – but with 1300 or so books loaded it really struggles with all the navigation tasks, plus I keep trying to turn the pages by tapping the screen. Unlike you I have no desire for page turn buttons (tastes differ so there can never be a perfect reading device).

    My wife and mother-in-law, who share my Amazon account, both read on generation 5 Paperwhites. One huge advantage of these e-readers is that they – largely successfully – pretend not to be computers. This means that they are much more “friendly” for a ninety year old who has no desire to have anything to do with the Internet or a “real” computer. I still have to provide a bit of telephone support but there is a hell of a lot less that can be done wrong than on a tablet.

    Oh, and I sometimes read on a PC whilst waiting for things to run (mostly these days when I’m doing high definition scans), though the main purpose of having the Kindle App on the PC is to give me somewhere to strip the DRM and store backups.

  24. Ancient (2010) e-ink Nook, still running just fine. I insist on e-ink, so that I won’t have a light shining in my eyes. I do have books on my MS SurfacePro 3, and it looks beautiful, but it’s too shiny.

  25. Mainly on the Kindle Voyage with the light turned up high.
    Older Kindle Fire DX for books that have photos and sometimes for night reading with black screen.
    One Plus One 5.5″ phone if I don’t have the Voyage.

  26. I read on a 5.5″ Android phone, a Kindle Paperwhite 3 and an iPad Air. I ready mostly web content on my phone, long form text on my Kindle and comic books on my iPad.

    I don’t expect to get the next Kindle since mine is pretty much the best experience with text reading. I don’t care for page turn buttons or automatic view shifting between portrait and landscape.

  27. I read webcomics/news/blogs on my Asus Transformer Infinity (bought it used, rooted it, running the ZombiPop ROM) using Inoreader via the News+ app.

    I switch to my Nook Simple Touch (bought it refurb, rooted it) to read eBooks.

    I am tempted to pick up a cheap/refurb/used eInk Kindle to take further advantage of my Prime membership.

  28. Victor Socolowski Neto // 6 April, 2016 at 4:14 pm // Reply

    I use a Galaxy Tab 3 Lite, mostly for reading Kobo ebooks and PDFs, and a Redmi 2 for Internet.

  29. E-books on Sony T-3 and Moto X cellp[hone. PDFS (comics) and magazines on ASUS ZenPad Z580CA 8 in tablet. Magazines and newspapers on varios paper products,

  30. Mostly Kobo Aura H2O but sometimes my Kindle. I don’t mind the extra weight of the H2O, and love the larger screen. I can’t go bigger unless they can solve the weight problem. I would like an 8 or even 10 inch reader but not if it weighs a ton.

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