Six More Apps That Help You Make eBooks

When I published a list of eight apps and services you could use to make an ebook about a week back, a bunch of readers responded with suggestions for other apps they either liked to use or had developed.

I think more info is usually better, so here are six more apps and services you can use to make an ebook.

Atlantis

In this day and age almost everyone has to use MS Office, Google Docs, or Libri Office in order to stay compatible with their colleagues, so you would think that the lesser known word processing apps would simply wither away and die.

Atlantis would suggest that is a faulty conclusion. This app doesn't get much attention but it is still popular with some authors.

Draft2Digital

This company is known for being one of the best ebook distributors, but you can also use their service to produce an Epub from your source Word file. This is strictly intended as a proof copy, but there's nothing stopping you from using it like any other ebook.

Reedsy

Speaking of distributors with hidden depths, Reedy has an online ebook editor which can be used to make an Epub ebook or a PDF (for POD).

You can find out more on Reedsy's blog post. And once you have tried Reedsy's editor, head on over to the Papyrus website and try theirs.

Papyrus

This online editor can help you make an ebook from scratch, or you can use it to assemble an ebook from blog posts and web pages.

I found Papyrus really useful when I tried it two years ago, but it won't work for me today. For some unknown reason it is kicking me out of the ebook project I started two years ago.

Oh, well, maybe I will try this next service instead.

Bookbinder

This online service costs $19 per title and is entirely new to me.

It offers both a simple conversion as well as an online editor you can use to format an ebook.

Viewporter

Viewporter is a relatively new app that makes Epub3 ebooks. I don't know anyone who has used it, so all first-hand user reports would be appreciated.

About Nate Hoffelder (10619 Articles)
Nate Hoffelder is the founder and editor of The Digital Reader:"I've been into reading ebooks since forever, but I only got my first ereader in July 2007. Everything quickly spiraled out of control from there. Before I started this blog in January 2010 I covered ebooks, ebook readers, and digital publishing for about 2 years as a part of MobileRead Forums. It's a great community, and being a member is a joy. But I thought I could make something out of how I covered the news for MobileRead, so I started this blog."

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  1. Digitala bok- och biblioteknyheter, v15: Är pappersboken elitistisk? – Boken år noll

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