How an E-ink Screen is Made (video)

How an E-ink Screen is Made (video) Conferences & Trade shows e-Reading Hardware Aside from the Triton 2 color E-ink screen there wasn't much to new see from E-ink this time around (and even that screen looks pretty much like the earlier Triton screen), so here's something interesting to take the place of the non-news.

The following video shows the CMO of E-ink, Sriram Peruvemba, as he explains the steps involved in making an E-ink screen. I've covered this briefly before (here), but I didn't have the props to use to explain it on video. Sriram does a much better job of taking you through the steps.

About Nate Hoffelder (9946 Articles)
Nate Hoffelder is the founder and editor of The Digital Reader:He's here to chew bubble gum and fix broken websites, and he is all out of bubble gum. He has been blogging about indie authors since 2010 while learning new tech skills at the drop of a hat. He fixes author sites, and shares what he learns on The Digital Reader's blog. In his spare time, he fosters dogs for A Forever Home, a local rescue group.

3 Comments on How an E-ink Screen is Made (video)

  1. I was hoping for a how its made type video from the factory. oh well

  2. He shows that e-Ink displays are incredibly easy to build – much easier than TFTs. Just glue the foil on a backplane and you are done. No alignment, no spacers, no liquids, etc. The e-Ink foil itself can’t be that expensive either (“buckets”, sheets measured in kilometers – sounds like cheap mass production). That it’s simply cut to the required shape makes it even easier. [Btw, a one kilometer sheet the width of his desk gives over a 100000 6″ displays.]

    Now, 9″ TFTs with backlight are less then $10 (volume price). So, why are e-Ink displays that expensive? The only answer I have: the monopoly – they’ve bought every competitor …

    • Volume (E-ink doesn’t produce as many screens as LCD screen makers) and excess capacity (there’s far more LC screen factory lines than is actually needed)

      Also, the knockoff screen from the Chinese company cost $5 to $10 less.

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