E-ink Unveils a 19 Foot E-ink Screen

E-ink Unveils a 19 Foot E-ink Screen e-Reading Hardware E-ink has gotten into digital signage in a big way. They've just installed a new sign at the UN headquarters in NYC that measures more than 5.8 meters diagonally.

The eWall, as it has been named, has been installed the North Delegates Lounge. It was donated by the government of The Netherlands and will be used to provide UN delegates with scheduling, news, and other relevant information.

As you can see in the photo below, the sign consists of 231 individual screen panels arranged in a grid 33 panels wide by 7 panels tall. If you zoom in you'll see that it's pretty easy to identify the edges of each panel:

E-ink Unveils a 19 Foot E-ink Screen e-Reading Hardware

E-ink, MPico, and Pervasive Displays have partnered to build the sign, which consists of 231 screen panels. The 7.4" screens use E-ink's Pearl screen tech and were mounted on backplanes by Pervasive Display. Each one measure 7.4" across (it's one of their stock sizes). Each panel has a screen resolution of 800x480, giving the 19 foot plus screen a combined resolution of 26,400 x 3,360 pixels.

The overall integration into a single sign, including the physical construction, electronics, and control software, is the work of Mpico.  This sign is designed to be updated remotely, and according to the press release it can be updated over the internet and display either info, blank screens, or images.

E-ink is saying that this is the single largest epaper sign ever created, and when it comes to resolution they are probably correct. But if you consider simply the size then they might be wrong.

Toppan Printing Co, which I have mentioned before, has been producing for the past decade a modular sign product similar to the eWall shown above. I don't know the size of the largest screen they produced, but it's entirely possible that Toppan made a sign that was larger than 19' in size.

E-ink

Nate Hoffelder

View posts by Nate Hoffelder
Nate Hoffelder is the founder and editor of The Digital Reader: He's here to chew bubble gum and fix broken websites, and he is all out of bubble gum. He has been blogging about indie authors since 2010 while learning new tech skills at the drop of a hat. He fixes author sites, and shares what he learns on The Digital Reader's blog. In his spare time, he fosters dogs for A Forever Home, a local rescue group.

8 Comments

  1. Puzzled29 September, 2013

    If this isn’t going to be a target of political hacking, I don’t know what is.

    e-Ink needs to work on thinner bevels…

    Reply
  2. Name29 September, 2013

    Since we need larger reading devices, let’s hope some manufacturer brings one of their 10.2 inch displays to use. Though their 160 dpi aren’t that great, this should be a first step.

    Reply
  3. Paul30 September, 2013

    At least Colin Powell won’t have to drape a curtain over it, like he had to in 2003 over the Iraq war (because the Picasso artwork behind him was a picture of civilians being bombed and killed during the Spanish civil war).

    Reply
  4. […] on integrating E-ink screen tech into a diverse range of products, including everything from modular signage to shipping labels, luggage tags, and even DIY […]

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  5. […] and less impressive than past projects. A reader reminded me of a similar installation which was installed a UN lounge in 2013. That used multiple 7.4" E-ink screens to create a 19-foot display with a resolution of 26,400 x […]

    Reply
  6. […] example, in 2013 MPico Systems and Pervasive Displays partnered to build a 19-foot sign and install it in the UN headquarters in NYC. The eWall was installed in the North Delegates Lounge, and […]

    Reply
  7. […] E-ink Unveils a 19 Foot E-ink Screen on The Digital Reader […]

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  8. […] And they're not the only ones interested in using E-ink in wall signs. Mpico, E-ink, and Pervasive Displays installed a similar (albeit much larger) 19' display in the UN in September 2013. […]

    Reply

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