The History of English in Ten Minutes (video)

The History of English in Ten Minutes (video) Blast from the Past humor English has sometimes been jokingly described as the result of Norman conquerors trying to make dates with Saxon barmaids, and there's more than a grain of truth in the joke.

The following History of English video came across my desk last week.

In 10 one minute episodes, it shows the growth and change of English since before it was English. Starting with the invasion of the Anglo-Saxons and ending with Internet and Global English, this video shows just where many of our commonly used words came from.

The entire video is actually over 11 minutes long and rather densely packed with information, so I am betting I am not the only person who has not seen it all the way through. With that in mind, I would suggest heading over to the Open University website and viewing each of the chapters individually (especially the one on the influence of dictionaries).

If I hadn't done that then I wouldn't know that they got a number of details wrong in the chapter on Internet English. For example, a number of words like download and reboot were invented for the computer age, not the internet age. And firewall? That was a construction term which was adapted to a new use and a new meaning.

Still, even with the errors it's well worth watching.

P.S. For more fun with English, here is a video which proves English pronunciation is crazy.

Nate Hoffelder

View posts by Nate Hoffelder
Nate Hoffelder is the founder and editor of The Digital Reader: He's here to chew bubble gum and fix broken websites, and he is all out of bubble gum. He has been blogging about indie authors since 2010 while learning new tech skills at the drop of a hat. He fixes author sites, and shares what he learns on The Digital Reader's blog. In his spare time, he fosters dogs for A Forever Home, a local rescue group.

2 Comments

  1. […] English language has a history of borrowing words, letters, and even tenses from other languages, or as James Nicoll put it “pursued […]

    Reply
  2. […] is a crazy language with irrational and illogical syntax which is largely due to a history stemming from Norman conquerors trying to hookup with Saxon barmaids. It has stolen bits and […]

    Reply

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