Infographic: How to Read Like a Detective

Sometimes we use tricks to avoid reading a book, but when we're not shirking the activity of reading it pays to read closely and get as much detail as possible.

The following infographic can help hone your analytical skills. It features advice on how to “look for clues,” “ask questions,” and “making your case.” I’ve embedded the full image below for you to explore further; what do you think?

Infographic: How to Read Like a Detective Infographic

GalleyCat

image by pasukaru76

Nate Hoffelder

View posts by Nate Hoffelder
Nate Hoffelder is the founder and editor of The Digital Reader: He's here to chew bubble gum and fix broken websites, and he is all out of bubble gum. He has been blogging about indie authors since 2010 while learning new tech skills at the drop of a hat. He fixes author sites, and shares what he learns on The Digital Reader's blog. In his spare time, he fosters dogs for A Forever Home, a local rescue group.

2 Comments

  1. tiggerthewing20 January, 2016

    An Autistic Approach To Reading Assignments

    “What words stick out at me?” should be “What? Words stick out at me!”

    “Who is speaking in the text and why?”

    The character, because the author wrote that they are speaking.

    “What seems most important?” Carrying on reading until I’ve finished. Housework much less so.

    “What questions do I have?” How about “Why won’t you leave me alone to finish this book? Are you being deliberately cruel?”

    “What do I think the author is trying to say?” Well, I’ll know if you’ll let me finish the damned book without interrupting with all these pointless questions!

    “Is there anything missing from the text?” I hope not, or I’ll have to have strong words with the publisher.

    “I think _______ because _______.” I think I’ll take a toilet break now, because I’ve just finished my coffee.

    “The text says _______, so _______.” The text says interesting things, so I’ll carry on reading.

    “The main idea of the text is _______.” The main idea of the text is to get the reader to carry on to the end of the book.

    “Here are 3 reasons why.” 1. So that the reader will enjoy the whole story. 2. So they’ll recommend it to other people. 3. So that the author sells more copies and can keep earning a living from writing.

    “What can you guess about the story from its clues?” Nothing. What clues? I’m just along for the ride!

    “What details do you notice when you re-read the text?” All of them. Why, did you think I’d just skim on subsequent readings?

    “What seems the most important to share?” The book.

    And coffee. Both are better when shared.

    Reply
  2. […] Infographic: How to Read Like a Detective […]

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