Infographic: Fahrenheit 451, by the Numbers

Infographic: Fahrenheit 451, by the Numbers Infographic

Ray Bradbury's seminal work, Fahrenheit 451, is taught in school's across the US, but how much do you know about it.

Did you know Ray Bradbury wrote the novel in 9 days on a rented typewriter?

I did, and you can find more details like that in the following infographic.

I think the most interesting detail about this infographic (besides the factoid it got wrong) is that it leaves out the most interesting background detail.

The author doesn't see this as being about book burning, and censorship. Instead it's a diatribe against the shallowness of tv as a medium. “Television gives you the dates of Napoleon, but not who he was,” Bradbury told LA Weekly.  He found the medium "useless", adding that “They stuff you with so much useless information, you feel full.”

Kinda like infographics, wouldn't you agree?

Infographic: Fahrenheit 451, by the Numbers Infographic

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Nate Hoffelder

View posts by Nate Hoffelder
Nate Hoffelder is the founder and editor of The Digital Reader: He's here to chew bubble gum and fix broken websites, and he is all out of bubble gum. He has been blogging about indie authors since 2010 while learning new tech skills at the drop of a hat. He fixes author sites, and shares what he learns on The Digital Reader's blog. In his spare time, he fosters dogs for A Forever Home, a local rescue group.

1 Comment

  1. Will O'Neil16 May, 2016

    I thought it was a very powerful, well-crafted book. I also thought it a very pretentious, narcissistic book, rather like an “Atlas Shrugged” on the left. I have no more love for TV than Bradbury, but the idea that we “superior” people have a mission to save the “common” people from themselves and their own choices is not congenial to me.

    Reply

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