Amazon Charts is a Weekly Best-Seller List

Amazon Charts is a Weekly Best-Seller List Amazon Move over, NYTimes. It's time to close up shop, USA Today.

Amazon has launched a best-seller list called Amazon Charts.

The retailer has distilled its genre and category best-seller lists into a quartet of lists of the top-selling and most-read books (fiction and non-fiction get different lists).

The lists reflect the activities of Amazon customers across all types of books: print, digital, and audio. Each entry will include a buy button (and a "read now" button) so consumers can find out more.

The list will be posted every Wednesday, and will be based on the previous week's activities.

From the press release:

Key Amazon Charts features include:

  • What’s really being read: Amazon Charts Top 20 Most Read is the first list to rank books by the average number of daily Kindle readers and daily Audible listeners each week – giving customers the opportunity to see what’s actively being read or listened to every week.
  • What’s really being bought or borrowed: Amazon Charts Top 20 Most Sold ranks books according to the number of copies sold and pre-ordered through Amazon.com, Audible.com and Amazon Books stores and books borrowed from Amazon’s subscription programs such as Kindle Unlimited, Audible.com, and Prime Reading.
  • The stories behind the books: When exploring Amazon Charts, readers can browse fun insights into how other readers are reacting to each book. From which books were Most Anticipated according to the rate of customer pre-orders, to which Kindle books were simply Unputdownable, according to how quickly customers read a book from cover to cover.

Nate Hoffelder

View posts by Nate Hoffelder
Nate Hoffelder is the founder and editor of The Digital Reader: He's here to chew bubble gum and fix broken websites, and he is all out of bubble gum. He has been blogging about indie authors since 2010 while learning new tech skills at the drop of a hat. He fixes author sites, and shares what he learns on The Digital Reader's blog. In his spare time, he fosters dogs for A Forever Home, a local rescue group.

12 Comments

  1. DaveMich18 May, 2017

    One very interesting thing about this on first look is that every book is listed with both it’s publisher AND it’s agent (yes, agent) prominently shown.

    Reply
    1. Will Entrekin18 May, 2017

      My guess is the reason for that is the myriad recent stories of production companies picking up properties based on book sales. If I’m a producer considering a hot new property, boom, I’ve got the contact info of exactly whom to contact to ask about optioning.

      Reply
      1. MKS18 May, 2017

        Is this a service Amazon is offering that tradpub does not offer?

        Reply
        1. Will Entrekin19 May, 2017

          I think it usually requires a lot more digging. It’s been years since I considered looking for an agent, but I remember the advice given to authors used to be find a book like yours, open it up, and check the acknowledgements to see if the author thanked their agent, then look them up.

          Reply
  2. DaveMich18 May, 2017

    Another is that of the top 20 most READ books, 5 of them are Harry Potter books.

    Reply
  3. MKS18 May, 2017

    Which means that books *without* agents will be readily identified.

    Reply
  4. Frank18 May, 2017

    These four lists are interesting.

    There is still room for NY Times and USA Today to publish their book lists since they use other sources of information.

    Reply
    1. Darryl18 May, 2017

      But unless they clean up their act they are going to start looking increasingly ridiculous and their credibility is going to suffer further. Any manipulation will stand out.

      Reply
  5. Bob Luedtke18 May, 2017

    That’s why the Amazon lists will be called irrelevant by the Trad Pub group.

    Reply
  6. Hannah Steenbock19 May, 2017

    I love it.

    It’ll help understand the market much better than underreported print sales. Including publisher and agent is brilliant, as it’ll bring those into the boat (everyone loves seeing their names on such lists!). And I love the distinction between “most read” and “most sold” – very important.

    This will most definitely be at least a balancing view compared to those rigged old-fashioned bestseller lists.

    Reply
  7. […] 5.Amazon Charts is a Weekly Best-Seller List […]

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  8. […] It looks like Amazon has found a customer for data from Amazon Charts, the weekly best-seller list launched in May 2017. […]

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