Leaked iPhone 8 Renders Show Dual-Cameras, Rear Touch ID Sensor

Due out sometime this fall, the iPhone 8 is rumored to have an edge-to-edge screen and vertical dual cameras (but only on the high-end models).

And recently uncovered renders would seem to support the rumors, although some argue that these images are fakes.

9to5Mac posted the leaked" renders yesterday, writing:

The top image seen above appears to show the Touch ID finger print sensor located on the rear side of the iPhone just under the Apple logo. Reports and predictions so far have not settled on whether or not Apple will be able to mass produce new iPhones with Touch ID integrated into the front display.

Moving the finger print sensor to the back side as seen on several Android handsets has been suggested based on various schematic leaks and analyst predictions.

The new images appeared on Weibo today and could be inaccurate depictions of how the iPhone 8 will look when it ships, especially if Touch ID is integrated in the front display. Other details to note include the lack of glass on the rear side when analysts predict the next generation iPhone will feature a glass front and back in part to accommodate wireless charging. These images appear to show the same jet black glossy finish on the black version while the white version includes silver and gold aluminum casing like the iPhone 6 through 7.

The front display also doesn’t appear to offer the expanded camera setup expected to ship on the iPhone 8 later this year, although these could be indicators of the design in an early stage. Back in April, schematics leaked claiming to show one version of the iPhone 8 design with a similar look as these units.

While these images are credible, there's at least one expert who disputes their accuracy. Bejamin Greskin wrote on Twitter that "All my sources said that this is totally wrong design. iPhone 8 is not going to look like that."

In an earlier tweet, he also linked to this Youtube which showed a dummy iPhone 8 unit:

It's hard to tell who is right, but I have to agree with the commenters on 9to5Mac who thought the touch ID sensor looked ugly as shown in the render at the top of this post.

If Apple is going to move that sensor to the rear of the iPhone 8 then it would look better if integrated with the Apple logo. That would combine form and function, leaving the iPhone 8 pretty while putting the touch ID sensor in a convenient location.

Nate Hoffelder

View posts by Nate Hoffelder
Nate Hoffelder is the founder and editor of The Digital Reader: He's here to chew bubble gum and fix broken websites, and he is all out of bubble gum. He has been blogging about indie authors since 2010 while learning new tech skills at the drop of a hat. He fixes author sites, and shares what he learns on The Digital Reader's blog. In his spare time, he fosters dogs for A Forever Home, a local rescue group.

4 Comments

  1. Mackay Bell25 May, 2017

    Moving the touch sensor to the back would be awkward, requiring you either flip the phone back and forth to start up or feeling around with your finger to find edges (and Apple usually smooths edges.) It would also limit what kind of cases people can use with the phone. I doubt it is going to happen.

    Reply
    1. Nate Hoffelder25 May, 2017

      I disagree on the point of usability, but you have a good point about cases. That is a good reason not to put the sensor on the back.

      Unfortunately, that won’t stop the company that put the iPhone’s antenna exactly where most people were going to grip it and short it out – the same company that designed this case:
      http://www.gizmodo.co.uk/2015/12/of-course-tim-cook-is-defending-that-fugly-iphone-6s-battery-case/

      Reply
  2. Frank26 May, 2017

    I would like having the Touch ID button on the rear and if this was the case on the iPhone 8 case manufacturers would make a hole for the button.

    Reply
  3. Frank26 May, 2017
    Reply

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