Infographic: 200 Good Words to Use Instead of “Good”

Do you find yourself using the word “good” to describe just about anything?

I will confess that I find myself falling back on the use of the word "awesome" far too often, and that is why I was pleased to find the following infographic.

It lists two hundred colorful words and phrases that you can use in place of the word "good", better, best, or great (which is probably as stale as "good").

Infographic: 200 Good Words to Use Instead of “Good” Infographic

Nate Hoffelder

View posts by Nate Hoffelder
Nate Hoffelder is the founder and editor of The Digital Reader: He's here to chew bubble gum and fix broken websites, and he is all out of bubble gum. He has been blogging about indie authors since 2010 while learning new tech skills at the drop of a hat. He fixes author sites, and shares what he learns on The Digital Reader's blog. In his spare time, he fosters dogs for A Forever Home, a local rescue group.

9 Comments

  1. Allen F7 August, 2017

    I’ll add it to my list of 300 ways to say ‘said’ … 😛

    Reply
    1. Nate Hoffelder7 August, 2017

      hehehe

      Reply
  2. vrf7 August, 2017

    Good post.

    Reply
  3. Alicia Butcher Ehrhardt7 August, 2017

    Bookmarked. Faster than the Scrivener built-in thesaurus.

    Now, if you wouldn’t mind creating one quickly for ‘get,’ my worst sin…

    Reply
  4. Reader7 August, 2017

    Good posting.

    Reply
  5. Frank8 August, 2017

    Excellent list

    Reply
  6. BDR8 August, 2017

    Sometimes good is good enough. Often/most often, if you need to go further, explaining *why* it’s good is probably a better option than substituting a ridiculously superlative synonym.

    When it comes to writing, ‘what would Hemingway do’ is a good — but certainly not exquisite — guiding principle.

    Reply
    1. Nate Hoffelder8 August, 2017

      good point

      Reply
  7. […] 200 Good Words to Use Instead of “Good” & 14 Worn-Out Words & What You Can Use Instead – Both of these will help you learn new words. Often I will hear my students use the word “interesting” too much. Follow these links to learn words to use instead. […]

    Reply

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