33 Ornament, Dingbat, and Other Decorative Fonts You Can Use (Legally and For Free) in Your Next eBook

33 Ornament, Dingbat, and Other Decorative Fonts You Can Use (Legally and For Free) in Your Next eBook content creation Font

Fonts are cool, and they are probably the biggest reason that this blogger envies authors. Authors are free to embed fonts in their ebooks or use them in the layout of a print book, while I, on the other hand, publish to the web, which  means I can (or at least I should) only use the fonts that I know are on most web browsers (these are called “web-safe fonts”).

The closest I can come to using a decorative font is creating a banner and then adding the image to a site's design, and that has me gnashing my teeth because I won't much fun with the fonts I am going to share with you today.

I was reading a post on The Book Designer this morning, and it got me thinking about fonts. Joel shared a PDF showing 110 decorative font characters that authors could use in their next book.

That was a pretty cool PDF, but do  you know what would be even cooler? A ZIP file with fonts you could use in your next ebook.

Here it is: Ornamental Fonts.zip

The file contains 33 fonts, totaling about 500 characters you can use in your next book.

I checked, and all of the font files in the ZIP are legal for both for personal and commercial use. That means you can put them in the ebook you sell at Kobo, Apple Books, and other ebookstores. That is an important detail because, as we learned in Cockygate, if you don't have a commercial license, you cannot use the font in anything you sell.

There is a small amount of redundancy; one developer, for example, created three different fonts just for flowers. (I think greater selection in a specific niche can be good.)

So tell me, which one do you like the most?

P.S. please let me know what you make with these fonts; I would really like to see it!

Nate Hoffelder

View posts by Nate Hoffelder
Nate Hoffelder is the founder and editor of The Digital Reader. He has been blogging about indie authors since 2010 while learning new tech skills weekly. He fixes author sites, and shares what he learns on The Digital Reader's blog. In his spare time, he fosters dogs for A Forever Home, a local rescue group.

5 Comments

  1. Sharon23 January, 2019

    This is great! Thanks so much. I remember thinking the same thing about Joel’s post.

    Haven’t used them yet but these are the kinds of fonts that are useful for scene breaks – so I’ll report back. Problematic for ebooks, but for print, they’re just great.

    Reply
    1. Nate Hoffelder23 January, 2019

      Or, you could use them as an ornament at the start of a chapter.

      Reply
  2. Marilynn Byerly23 January, 2019

    So, a font doesn’t have to be preloaded into your ebook reader to see it? I didn’t know that.

    Reply
    1. Nate Hoffelder23 January, 2019

      you can embed it in an ebook, yes

      Reply
  3. Hannah Steenbock25 January, 2019

    Late, but I certainly grabbed them, since I do format my own ebooks. This will be fun to play with.

    Reply

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