Are You Desperate Enough to Try the Most Dangerous Writing App?

Are You Desperate Enough to Try the Most Dangerous Writing App? Writing

I just finished my next guest blog post for The Book Designer. It took me over a day to finish, in part because this was a difficult topic for me but also because I excel at procrastination.

Something tells me I should have looked at apps like the The Most Dangerous Writing App sooner; they might have reduced the time I wasted. (I will look at the apps tomorrow, I promise.) TMDWA is a relatively simple browser-based writing app with a simple premise: It's designed  to keep you writing for five minutes at a stretch.  Built by Manuel Ebert, the app is coded so that if you stop typing for ten or fifteen seconds, your words start to fade. If you don't start typing again the app will kick you out. You'll be given the option to download your work, and then start again.

It's a nifty premise but I do wish that I could set it for a longer delay.  There have been times I have been stuck thinking up the word I want to use, and this app just doesn't give me me enough time to ponder before booting me out.

What do you think of the app?

The Most Dangerous Writing App via BoingBoing

image by Liz Henry via Flickr

Nate Hoffelder

View posts by Nate Hoffelder
Nate Hoffelder is the founder and editor of The Digital Reader. He has been blogging about indie authors since 2010 while learning new tech skills weekly. He fixes author sites, and shares what he learns on The Digital Reader's blog. In his spare time, he fosters dogs for A Forever Home, a local rescue group.

2 Comments

  1. Will Entrekin18 September, 2019

    Seems a bit like Write or Die, which I use now and then and which has the customization options you mention. I sometimes like not being able to ponder, which for me is often just another word for staring off into space or looking something up online or turning to pet my dog or myriad other things that aren’t putting the next word down.

    https://writeordie.com/

    Reply
  2. Marilynn Byerly18 September, 2019

    Writing, particularly fiction, is as much about staring into space as it is about typing. Typing and not thinking is being a secretary, not a writer.

    Reply

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