Morning Coffee – 25 May 2020

Here are a few stories to read this Monday morning.

Nate Hoffelder

View posts by Nate Hoffelder
Nate Hoffelder is the founder and editor of The Digital Reader. He has been blogging about indie authors since 2010 while learning new tech skills weekly. He fixes author sites, and shares what he learns on The Digital Reader's blog. In his spare time, he fosters dogs for A Forever Home, a local rescue group.

5 Comments

  1. Allen F25 May, 2020

    On the two of distractions, simply turn off the internet – how hard can it be? (If it is ‘that hard’ then you weren’t that interested in writing me thinks! 😉 )

    Everyone has enough paper books for now – and places are opening back up in the US, so less reading time …

    As far as those so-called ‘enhanced ebooks’ go is they keep forgetting/ignoring something very basic. A ‘paper’ book doesn’t offer audio/video without becoming something else, and an ebook is no different. Then there’s also the not so minor consideration that if I bought an ebook I bought it because I ‘didn’t’ want some audio/video experience I wanted something to ‘read’ …

    Reply
    1. Nate Hoffelder25 May, 2020

      that’s kinda hard if you work on the internet

      Reply
      1. Allen F25 May, 2020

        If you mean they’re using google docs or something to write with, okay maybe; but what can you buy today that doesn’t have some kind of basic word processor already built it that doesn’t need the internet? I confess I’m still using Word 2000 as it has a basic spell checker if needed.

        Reply
        1. Disgusting Dude25 May, 2020

          Actually, you don’t need to buy anything.
          There’s free offline word processors and even full suites for most any platform, even phones.
          (Need we list them?)

          If you’re tied to an online only product it is by choice, not need.
          And for some of us Google is at the end of a long list of free or paid options.

          Reply
          1. Allen F25 May, 2020

            Ah, I meant that if you bought a phone/laptop/computer/Pi it came with some type of word processor, not that you had to buy the word processor. I’ve used the old open office on non-PC systems. 😉

            (and I don’t used any of the online services because I’m often offline and don’t wish to keep changing tools mid-story.)

            Reply

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