Infographic: (Almost) Every (Western) Literary Movement in the History of Literature Summed up in a Single Sentence

Spark Notes has boiled down the history of literary movements to a collection of one line quips.

The problem with literature is that there’s so much of it. Books go back a long time (like at least ten or fifteen years, I’m thinking), and if you’re a student taking an English class, you’re supposed to be familiar with basically all of them.

But that’s impossible. Allow us, then, to suggest an alternate strategy: you fake it. The following literary movements and periods span whole centuries, numerous cultural milestones, and multiple historical turning points, but we have taken the liberty of reducing them all to a single sentence. This should be more than sufficient to convince your teacher you actually did the reading.

Note: I phrased this as "almost" because I know enough to tell that it misses just about all the eastern literary movements (as well as more than a few western ones). This graphic also curiously leaves out SF and fantasy but includes magic realism, which is a blend of the two.

Infographic: (Almost) Every (Western) Literary Movement in the History of Literature Summed up in a Single Sentence Infographic

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About Nate Hoffelder (10071 Articles)
Nate Hoffelder is the founder and editor of The Digital Reader:"I've been into reading ebooks since forever, but I only got my first ereader in July 2007. Everything quickly spiraled out of control from there. Before I started this blog in January 2010 I covered ebooks, ebook readers, and digital publishing for about 2 years as a part of MobileRead Forums. It's a great community, and being a member is a joy. But I thought I could make something out of how I covered the news for MobileRead, so I started this blog."

3 Comments on Infographic: (Almost) Every (Western) Literary Movement in the History of Literature Summed up in a Single Sentence

  1. Very funny and insightful, some really nailed it (Modernist, Transcendentalism)

  2. As you point out, that headline is very misleading, especially for a post which makes fun of so many other people.

  3. It also leaves out a vast majority of the periods of American literature.

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