Amazon KFX Format Updated With Support for MathML

Amazon KFX Format Updated With Support for MathML Kindle (platform)

Yesterday's changelog for the Kindle for PC update mentioned that you could use the app to zoom in on math equations, and now we know why.

Amazon released a new version of the (technical) Kindle Publishing Guidelines last week, and buried in the long and detailed changelog was a one line mention of MathML. This is a markup language that is used to write math equations in much the same way that html is used to format ebooks.

Amazon's KFX ebook format now supports MathML - mostly. The guidelines name seven tags that are explicitly listed as not supported, and there could be more that aren't mentioned (I have not been able to find a list of all MathML tags).

Edit: Actually, it doesn't support MathML at all. Amazon was being misleading when they said it was supported; what Amazon actually does is convert the equation to an image and display that.

While Amazon had announced last December that screen readers could read aloud math equations in Kindle ebooks, there was no information at that time on how one would go about inserting an equation into a Kindle ebook.

Today's news filled in that knowledge gap.

 

 

 

Nate Hoffelder

View posts by Nate Hoffelder
Nate Hoffelder is the founder and editor of The Digital Reader: He's here to chew bubble gum and fix broken websites, and he is all out of bubble gum. He has been blogging about indie authors since 2010 while learning new tech skills at the drop of a hat. He fixes author sites, and shares what he learns on The Digital Reader's blog. In his spare time, he fosters dogs for A Forever Home, a local rescue group.

3 Comments

  1. Commenter20 April, 2018

    >>> “The guidelines name seven tags that are explicitly listed as not supported, and there could be more that aren’t mentioned (I have not been able to find a list of all MathML tags).”

    All of MathML can be found at the W3C’s specs:

    https://www.w3.org/TR/MathML/

    You could also use Mozilla’s documentation for some more examples:

    https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/MathML/Element/mn

    Reply
    1. Nate Hoffelder20 April, 2018

      thank you.

      Reply
  2. Commenter21 April, 2018

    You’re welcome.

    Mozilla also has a few other MathML pages (easier to read than the links above):

    https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/MathML

    and they have this “MathML Torture Test”, where you could see a few really hard MathML test cases rendering in the browser:

    https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Mozilla/MathML_Project/MathML_Torture_Test

    Reply

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