Kindle Fire Nabs 33% Android Tablet Market Share

Kindle Fire Nabs 33% Android Tablet Market Share e-Reading Hardware Barnes & Noble might not be in a good mood today but Amazon is probably celebrating (so should B&N). The app analytics firm Localytics has just released a new snapshot of the global Android tablet market and Amazon has cleaned up.

According to the little bits of tracking code that Localytics' app developer partners have been inserting into their apps, Amazon can now claim a 33% share of all the Android tablets now in use.

In the world.

Localytics' data showed that the majority of Android were owned and used in the US (59%), and that nearly all of the Kindle Fires were also located in the US (89% of 33%).

These figures are far from a complete view of the tablets in use, but if you take them with a grain of salt then there are a few things we can learn. For example, Google is hot on Samsung's heels. The Nexus 7 represents 8% of the Android tablets in use, while Samsung's Galaxy family accounts for 9%.

Kindle Fire Nabs 33% Android Tablet Market Share e-Reading Hardware

And then there's the surprising detail about the Nook hardware. These enhanced ereaders (NC, NT, HD, HD+) now represent 10% of all tablets in use. I will admit to being very surprised; this raises questions.

I wonder if perhaps B&N's strategy of having frequent discount sales on refurbs may have boosted the number of tablets sold without actually getting the devices into the hands of the high spenders. The discounts pursued the budget market and the subsequent digital revenue could reflect that.

In any case, I don't put all that much weight in this data. It doesn't quite jive with other similarly inexact sources like Chitaka's ad network. Chitaka reported earlier this month that the Kindle Fire, Galaxy tablets, and the Nexus 7 all gained market share after the holidays. The Nook family of tablets were generating so few impressions that they weren't included in the chart.

You can take either set of data however you want, but I choose to be skeptical of both.

Nate Hoffelder

View posts by Nate Hoffelder
Nate Hoffelder is the founder and editor of The Digital Reader: He's here to chew bubble gum and fix broken websites, and he is all out of bubble gum. He has been blogging about indie authors since 2010 while learning new tech skills at the drop of a hat. He fixes author sites, and shares what he learns on The Digital Reader's blog. In his spare time, he fosters dogs for A Forever Home, a local rescue group.

8 Comments

  1. Jon Jermey28 January, 2013

    Clearly nobody’s counting the huge sales of generic Android tablets from China via eBay — currently there are 1203 sellers on Australian eBay alone.

    1. Nate Hoffelder28 January, 2013

      Tablets sales were estimated to be over 120 million unties last year. It’s entirely possible that those sellers were swallowed up in the mass.

  2. Mike Cane28 January, 2013

    Archos has shot itself in the face again.

    The Archos 97 Titanium Tablet Is Junk
    http://mikecanex.wordpress.com/2013/01/28/the-archos-97-titanium-tablet-is-junk/

    1. fjtorres28 January, 2013

      Sorry to hear that they weren’t able to get quality components after all.

  3. Jean K29 January, 2013

    The statistics don’t distinguish between the number of Kindle Fire vs Kindle Fire HD vs Kindle Fire HD+, though… Should we assume that everything is lumped together as with the Nook?

  4. […] la société Localytics , le géant de la vente en ligne posséderait pas moins de 33% de parts de marché des tablettes […]

  5. Mike Cane31 January, 2013

    NHot so fast:

    IDC: Apple’s iPad dropped to 43.6% tablet share in Q4, Samsung took second with 15.1%, Amazon third with 11.5%
    http://thenextweb.com/mobile/2013/01/31/apples-ipad-dropped-to-43-6-tablet-share-in-q4-samsung-took-second-with-15-1-and-amazon-settled-for-11-5/

    1. Nate Hoffelder31 January, 2013

      I didn’t really believe these numbers, and now that IHC disagrees I wonder if perhaps the older set of numbers comes from an ad network focused on English language sites and ads to the exclusion of all others.

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