27% of French readers admit to piracy

Arrgh, matey. There be a market here.The market research firm GfK have released the results of a recent survey. They polled 1 thousand internet users in France and asked about how they get their music, ebooks, and other digital content. To my surprise, streaming music actually beat out downloads by a couple percent, with most of the streamers going for free sources, instead of paid.

As for ebooks, 27% of respondents reported that they got content from pirate sites, and a significantly larger number got their content free from such public sites as Gallica Bibliothèque nationale de France (52%), with a smaller number going to retail sites like chapitre.com, Fnac, or 1001librairies.com (41%).

So nearly as many people pirate ebooks a buy them, and both segments are out weighed by the freegans. Of course, the numbers overlap, so it's not quite correct to use the label freegan.

What do you think it would take to move people from the pirate category to the buyer? My guess would be the old trifecta of price, convenience, and availability. The numbers suggest that few people are complete pirates; they still buy stuff. If they also pirate some content then there's probably some simple reason why. Fix it and they might become customers.

via Actualitte

image by chrispearson72

About Nate Hoffelder (11598 Articles)
Nate Hoffelder is the founder and editor of The Digital Reader:"I've been into reading ebooks since forever, but I only got my first ereader in July 2007. Everything quickly spiraled out of control from there. Before I started this blog in January 2010 I covered ebooks, ebook readers, and digital publishing for about 2 years as a part of MobileRead Forums. It's a great community, and being a member is a joy. But I thought I could make something out of how I covered the news for MobileRead, so I started this blog."

2 Comments on 27% of French readers admit to piracy

  1. I would know the percentage in Spain. I can ensure you it’ll so higher.

  2. Breaking a lance for the people who want to buy, but simply are not allowed to. Does that sound wrong? It does. It IS!

    If more publishers (I am specifically mentioning e-books here) would be less anal-retentive about publishing laws and regions, then I am sure there would be more people who buy e-books. At this moment it is very often impossible to buy an e-book simply because they say I am in the wrong part of the world. Where as I can buy the dead-tree version of a book in the same wrong part of the world without a problem. However, I bought an e-reader for its convenience, not to put it next to paper books.

    There is a market. The publishing industry just has to open up to it.

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