Author Lamentations: eBook Week Sales

The week of March 3-10 was "Read an eBook Week," which is a week that I particularly look forward to each year. It is the week when many authors put their ebooks on sale, with discounts ranging from 25% to 100% of the normal price. Smashwords is a major promoter of this event, and is usually where I go to buy more ebooks for my to-be-read pile.

In past years, I have spent several hundred dollars on indie ebooks during this week, and I have also "bought" a goodly number of 100%-discount ebooks. This year I bought 3 ebooks plus a dozen of the 100%-discount ebooks. I simply could not find more ebooks from indie authors that interested me; I did find several that I am interested in buying in the future, but I felt no rush to buy them now because they were not on sale. If I'm going to pay full price, I'll pay it when I am ready to read the ebook, not before.

On some of the fora in which I participate, authors were lamenting that "Read an eBook Week" didn't boost sales. One complaining author noted that before eBook Week his sales were at zero and during eBook Week his sales remained flat at zero. In his case, I think three things were at work: first, he didn't discount his book at all during a week when readers expect to find a discount; second, the subject-matter/genre of his ebook was not one that draws readers like bees to honey; and third, whether his book had ever seen the helping hand of a professional editor was doubtful based on the sample.

Other complaining authors noted slight upticks in sales, but not anything to boast about.

This year, unlike past years, authors seemed to be quiet about "Read an eBook Week." I saw very few pushes to get the word out by these indie authors, which made me wonder how they expected to get readers to notice their books. Many of them also opted for the smaller discounts. I admit that I didn't even bother to look at books in the 25% discount category and only once spent a little time in the 50% discount category. Most of my browsing was on the 75% and 100% discount categories, and based on comments made in response to the complaining authors, it appears my browsing was typical.

It is clear to me that authors with low to middling sales during eBook Week made several fundamental errors. First, they did little to no self-promotion so potential readers were not made aware of their ebooks. Stores like Smashwords promote the week itself, not individual ebooks; it is up to the indie author to promote his or her ebook, which means the author needs to make sure that tags are appropriate and numerous, that descriptions are well-written and targeted, and that the correct genre(s) are associated with the ebook. For example, I do not like books about vampires or the Harlequin-type romances or "gothic" novels. Consequently, when I see tags that identify an ebook as fitting in one of those categories, I pass it by. Of course, other readers cannot get enough of those categories, so they would be attracted -- if the ebook is properly tagged and described.

The second error was that they had a bad combination of too high a retail price and too low a discount for their book. Many ebookers are like me -- reluctant to spend $5.99 on an ebook from an author with whom they are unfamiliar and a 25% discount is little inducement. Authors need to think about the promotion. Many of these same authors joined Amazon's exclusive program and offered their ebook for free at Amazon for 5 days. So why not offer a steep discount for the 7 days of eBook Week?

The third error that a number of authors made was to offer the steep discount on the second or third book in a series, rather than on the first book. I cannot imagine what thinking lies behind that decision. Once I saw that the ebook was the second or third in a series and that the first book was not being discounted, I just moved on. I suspect many readers did the same.

The fourth error was in offering the same ebook this year as they offered last year and even the year before. I would think that by now most readers who are interested in the offered book have already obtained it. One of the purposes of eBook Week is to not only introduce your ebook to new readers but to reignite interest in you in readers who have some familiarity with you but who do not view your ebooks as "must" reads.

The fifth error was the failure to take the opportunity to rewrite the blurbs. Poorly written blurbs can kill a sale. If you haven't been selling a steady stream of ebooks, perhaps it is time to rewrite the blurb -- give the ebook a fresh coat of paint, but paint of a different color.

The sixth error is really not an error except in broad terms: It is the failure to recognize that it is possible that the subject matter of your ebook just doesn't have broad appeal or that if it does fall into the broad appeal area, that perhaps other books are better written (and better promoted). In other words, this isn't like A Field of Dreams where "if you write it, they will find it"

or "if you write it, they will buy it."

Readers tend to be a bit fussier than that.

I'm sure that only a few authors not guilty of all six failures, but every author who had disappointing sales during eBook Week is guilty of one or more of these failures. As an indie author, it is the author's responsibility to fix these failures, yet I am sure that many will take no corrective action and will find other excuses for why eBook Week was a failure for their ebook.

I have said this before, but it is worth repeating: There is a natural progression to getting someone to buy your ebook. It begins with the cover, runs through the story's development to the editing of the manuscript, and ends with the promotional efforts made by the author. A weakness in one area can be devastating. The indie author needs to be sure that current weaknesses are identified and addressed so as to pave the path for success. Authors who were disappointed by this year's eBook Week have a year until the next eBook Week and so can work toward making next year a success.

5 Comments on Author Lamentations: eBook Week Sales

  1. Seventh failure for you: WTF IS READ AN EBOOK WEEK???

  2. Another big issue is that there exists a massive glut of digital content of all kinds. Once something is digitized, be it a book or a movie or music, it can be endlessly distributed at near zero cost. There comes a point where consumers have access to such an abundance that they simply don’t need much more.

    Here’s an example of the effect of the digital glut. My family used to buy a lot of DVDs of movies. But, in the last couple of years, with the advent of Netflix, Amazon Prime streaming and Hulu, we haven’t bought a single one.

    Right now we are swimming in great masses of available ebooks. Your average hack writer churning out stock genre fiction is likely going to find that his precious ebook is just one grain of sand on the shores of a great digital ocean.

  3. I’m going to second the “WTF is Read an Ebook” week. I’ve heard of it, but didn’t really think of it as a certain week and wouldn’t have an idea where to find out about specials or how to indicate that my publishing company is participating.

    I even published an ebook and audio play last week and would have loved to piggyback on it. During last week’s release, I even offered what I considered to be generous sales and even a freebie ).

    In my case, I’m offering a special for a month, and my audience is specialized as it is, so I wouldn’t expect the general reader to be interested.

    I think it’s important for authors to form ongoing relationships with readers. Right now, that is primarily done on facebook and twitter (though a few years ago it was via blogs). But it’s not easy to attract the eye of the general reader unless someone posts a rec on facebook or social media. An ebook promotion week might be helpful if a reader knew where to go to deals.

    Another thing. Amazon, BN, Kobo don’t offer a lot of promotional tools in the way smashwords does. Smashwords is still the brash upstart in the market…..

  4. Actually, more than sales, i think ebook week needs a concerted effort for bloggers and facebookers to recommend indie titles that others haven’t heard of…. That’s probably more helpful than sales….

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